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$250-$500 CAD

  • Forge de Laguiole Barrel Oak Sommelier Corkscrew with Leather Case
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    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations. The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM SOM CHB BRI
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  • Forge de Laguiole Birchwood Sommelier
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    Forge de Laguiole

    Forge de Laguiole Birchwood Sommelier

    $320.00

    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations. The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM SOM-BO-BRI
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  • Forge de Laguiole Briarwood Sommelier
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    Forge de Laguiole

    Forge de Laguiole Briarwood Sommelier

    $320.00

    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations. The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM SOM-BR-BRI
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  • Forge de Laguiole Horn Sommelier
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    Forge de Laguiole

    Forge de Laguiole Horn Sommelier

    $315.00

    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations. The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM SOM B BRI
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  • Forge de Laguiole Olivewood Sommelier
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    Forge de Laguiole

    Forge de Laguiole Olivewood Sommelier

    $320.00

    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations.The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM SOM-OL-BRI

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  • Forge de Laguiole Orange Sommelier Corkscrew
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    Forge de Laguiole

    Forge de Laguiole Orange Sommelier Corkscrew

    $275.00

    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations.The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM SOM TC ORA BRI

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  • Forge de Laguiole Pistachio Sommelier
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    Forge de Laguiole

    Forge de Laguiole Pistachio Sommelier

    $320.00

    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations.The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM SOM-PI-BRI

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  • Forge de Laguiole Snakewood Sommelier
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    Forge de Laguiole

    Forge de Laguiole Snakewood Sommelier

    $320.00

    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations.The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM SOM-AM-BRI

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  • Forge de Laguiole Sommelier Corkscrew, Black Horn
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    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations. The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM 4PP-SOM-COR-HOR
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  • Forge de Laguiole Sommelier Corkscrew, Juniper
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    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations. The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM 4PP-SOM-COR-JUN
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  • Forge de Laguiole Sommelier Corkscrew, Marbled Horn
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    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations. The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM 4PP-SOM-COR-MHO

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  • Forge de Laguiole Sommelier Corkscrew, Oak
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    Forge de Laguiole

    Forge de Laguiole Sommelier Corkscrew, Oak

    $300.00

    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations. The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM 4PP-SOM-COR-OAK

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  • Forge de Laguiole Sommelier, Ebony
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    Forge de Laguiole

    Forge de Laguiole Sommelier, Ebony

    $415.00

    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations. The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM SOM EB BRI

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  • Forge de Laguiole Stag Wood Sommelier Corkscrew with Leather Case
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    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations. The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM SOM CF BRI

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  • Forge de Laguiole Subfossil Oak Crust Sommelier Corkscrew with Leather Case
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    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations. The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM SOM CHFE BRI

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  • Forge de Laguiole Thuya Sommelier
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    Forge de Laguiole

    Forge de Laguiole Thuya Sommelier

    $320.00

    In 1828 a local blacksmith in the French village of Laguiole (pronounced Lay-ol) hammered out the town’s first folding knife. A few decades later, as knife-making developed into a local industry, designer Pierre Jean Calmels refined the rustic pattern, giving the handle its signature sinuous shape and finishing each piece with ornamental flourishes such as bumblebees and shepherds’ crosses. After two world wars depleted manpower and wiped out production, the workshop reopened as Forge de Laguiole in 1987 under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. Each knife is still made by skilled craftsmen from start to finish, each one taking several hours or even days to manufacture. Nicolas Sarkosy’s office often commissioned these knives to be given to visiting heads of state.

    In your quest for all things Laguiole, beware of cheap imitations. The name Laguiole was never patented, so unlike legally protected denominations or origin such as Champagne, mass and machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic the original design.

    ITEM SOM-TH-BRI

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  • Georg Jensen Manhattan Ice Bucket and Tong
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    With a history that spans more than 100 years, the Georg Jensen brand represents quality craftsmanship and timeless aesthetic design, producing lifestyle products ranging from hollowware to watches, jewellery and home products.

    The philosophy of Georg Jensen himself was to create democratic designs possessing both functionality and beauty. His artisanal skill and artistic talent combined with his continuous ability to identify and support design talent was the foundation on which he built Georg Jensen in Copenhagen in 1904.

    Georg Jensen's sleek Manhattan bar collection takes inspiration from the glamorous Gatsby era of New York City. Crafted in mirror polished stainless steel, the Manhattan collection invites you to revive a culture that embraces the pleasures of artisanal cocktails and mixology. Taking influence from the Art Deco movement as well as the Georg Jensen archives, the collection's boldly geometric and decorative expression is an integral part of the Georg Jensen design legacy.

    Care: Mirrored Stainless Steel - Polish with Microfibre cloth.

    7" H (18cm)  • ITEM 3586086

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  • L'Atelier Du Vin Le Ratelier A Outils Du Vin Naturel
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    Since 1926, L’Atelier du Vin has specialised in supplies and equipment for wine-making, bottling and serving. Today, L’Atelier du Vin, thanks to its research, its wine tools and its wine education tools, is a specialist in being able to cover every step in the life of a wine from the cellar to the glass.

    Indispensable daily tools of L’Atelier du Vin for opening and preserving wines and champagnes, all together in a frame made of beech wood, for the kitchen or the cellar. Can be hung on the wall or placed on its easel. Make sure that the Râtelier is vertically positionned when it is hung on the wall.

    Included:
    1 Chic Monsieur + 1 Cork Opener + 1 Foil Cutter + 1 Bubble Cork + 1 Cork Stopper
    ITEM 095453-1
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  • Laguiole en Aubrac Concorde Sommelier Corkscrew
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    The Aubrac plateau and the village of Laguiole (pron. layol) have lent their name to these hand-crafted French knives. Beware of cheap imitations; machine-manufactured copycats can be found that mimic this original design.

    The stainless steel is made from pieces of the late Concorde plane, which was purchased at an auction in Toulouse by Laguiole en Aubrac. The steel is complemented by a white Corian handle, a five threaded helical coil and foil cutter. Each corkscrew is unique, and contains the artisan's engraving. The produce comes with certificate of authenticity. 

    ITEM 4LA-SOM99OCI/LSI1
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  • Rablabs Crystal Silver Kivita Coasters
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    The Kivita coasters, created as a set of two, allow for dramatic dinner table presentations. Edged in silver made of semi-precious white stone. 

    Approximately 4.5″ in diameter. Set of 2.

    ITEM KV-001

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  • Richard Brendon Fluted Decanter, 1 litre
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    Richard Brendon

    Richard Brendon Fluted Decanter, 1 litre

    $405.00

    Selected by Walpole as one of the trailblazing 2016 Brands of Tomorrow, Richard Brendon is known for his considered and refined designs. The London-based designer identifies and distills the best elements from the past and transforming them into contemporary designs.

    Richard Brendon draws inspiration from the decadent cocktail culture of the 1920’s for his late sine of crystal, Fluted. Designed for the American Bar at Gleneagles, the iconic Scottish country estate and luxury hotel, the Fluted line combines just the right amount of traditional and contemporary elements to create a progressive, yet timeless collection.  Mouth-blown by master craftsmen in Bohemia, the collection takes its name from the fluted cuts that run the length of each piece.

    Care: Hand wash and dry immediately

    Special Order, please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. 

    Should you have any questions, please contact us directly at info@hopsongrace.com or 416.926.1120 / 1.866.926.1120.

    1 L • ITEM RBF012

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  • Richard Brendon Fluted Small Decanter, 3.4oz
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    Selected by Walpole as one of the trailblazing 2016 Brands of Tomorrow, Richard Brendon is known for his considered and refined designs. The London-based designer identifies and distills the best elements from the past and transforming them into contemporary designs.

    Richard Brendon draws inspiration from the decadent cocktail culture of the 1920’s for his late sine of crystal, Fluted. Designed for the American Bar at Gleneagles, the iconic Scottish country estate and luxury hotel, the Fluted line combines just the right amount of traditional and contemporary elements to create a progressive, yet timeless collection.  Mouth-blown by master craftsmen in Bohemia, the collection takes its name from the fluted cuts that run the length of each piece.

    Care: Hand wash and dry immediately

    Special Order, please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. 

    Should you have any questions, please contact us directly at info@hopsongrace.com or 416.926.1120 / 1.866.926.1120.

    100ml • ITEM RBF009

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  • Tom Dixon Plum Wine Cooler
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    Currently Unavailable

    Tom Dixon

    Tom Dixon Plum Wine Cooler

    Currently Unavailable

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    Tom Dixon

    Tom Dixon Plum Wine Cooler

    $350.00

    Currently Unavailable

    An ideal centre piece to any dining experience this Plum Copper Wine Cooler is both form and function to the highest degree.

    Height(cm) : 20.00

    Width(cm) : 20.20

    Weight : 2.60 Kgs

    PMWC02

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